Frequently Asked Questions


Do I have a choice in which home health agency I use?

How do I get started?

How is this paid for?

What is home health?

Who is eligible to get Medicare-covered in home health care?




Do I have a choice in which home health agency I use?
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If your doctor decides you need home health care, you have the right to choose a home health to give you the care and services you need. Your choice should be honored by your doctor, hospital discharge planner, or other referring agency.

Most Medicare certified home health agencies will accept all Medicare patients. An agency is not required to accept a patient if it can't meet the patient's medical needs. An agency can't refuse to take a specific patient because of the patient's condition, unless the agency also refuses to take other people with the same condition.

How do I get started?
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That's easy! Just call us toll free at 866-938-5095.

How is this paid for?
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We accept Medicare and most insurance companies with pre-authorization.

What is home health?
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Home health is health care delivered to your home, including skilled nursing care, as well as other skilled care services, like physical and occupational therapy, speech-language therapy, and medical social services. These services are given by a variety of skilled health care professionals at home.

While you get home health care, home health staff teach you(and your caregivers) to continue any care you may need, including medication, wound care, therapy, and stress management. Since most home health care is intermittent and part-time, you (and your informed caregivers) should learn how to identify and care for possible problems, like confusion or shortness of breath.

Who is eligible to get Medicare-covered in home health care?
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Medicare will cover the following types of home health care:
  • Skilled nursing care on a part-time or intermittent basis. Skilled nursing care includes services and care that can only be performed safely and correctly by a licensed nurse (either a registered nurse or a licensed practical nurse).
  • Home health aide services on a part-time or intermittent basis. A home health aide doesn't have a nursing license, but supports the nurse by providing services such as help with bathing, using the bathroom, dressing, or other personal care. These types of services don't need the skills of a licensed nurse. Medicare doesn't cover home health aide services unless you are also getting skilled care such as nursing care or other therapy. The home health aide services must be part of the home care for your illness or injury.
  • Physical therapy, speech-language therapy, and occupational therapy for as long as your doctor says you need it.
    • Physical therapy includes exercise to regain movement and strength in a body area, and training on how to use special equipment or do daily activities, like how to get in and out of a wheelchair or bathtub.
    • Speech-language therapy (pathology services) includes exercise to regain and strengthen speech skills.
    • Occupational therapy includes exercise to help you do usual daily activities by yourself. You might learn new ways to eat, put on clothes, comb your hair, and perform other usual daily activities. You may continue to receive occupational therapy if ordered by your doctor even if you no longer need other skilled care.
  • Medical social services to help you with social and emotional concerns related to your illness. This might include counseling or help in finding resources in your community.
  • Certain medical supplies, like wound dressings (but not prescription drugs or biologicals).
  • Durable medical equipment, such as a wheelchair or walker.
  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved injectable osteoporosis drugs in certain circumstances.

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